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The Jody Maberry Show

The Jody Maberry Show explores the nature of business. With a mix of storytelling, lessons, and occasional guests, Jody will help you master and market your message.
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Now displaying: February, 2016
Feb 23, 2016

In preparation for an upcoming trip to Nashville, I decided to order some new business cards. I know there are people who don’t order business cards. That is fine. I also know at least one person who will not accept business cards. That is fine too, even though it can be a little awkward. But I can think of one situation when I ran out of business cards and decided not to order new ones. Who needs them, I thought. Then I gave a presentation for a home builders association. After I was done, I had someone tell me they wanted to talk about doing some work for them. They asked for a business card so they could follow up. I did not have a card, and I never heard from them. A business card is a simple, cheap way not to let that happen again. Some people like business cards and I want to make it as easy as possible for them to contact me. If 99 of your cards are thrown away, but the 100th person follows up with you, isn’t it still worth it? I think so, and I wanted to get some cards made for my trip to Nashville.

I ordered the cards through Moo.com because I have always been impressed with the quality of their products. This time, I got bold and ordered square business cards. More likely to get throw away I thought, but also more likely to stand out. So I quickly designed the front of a new card in Canva, uploaded my logo for the back of the card and submitted my order.

The cards arrived a few days later, and I was excited to open them. As soon as I slide the square white card out of the box I realized I had made an error. The logo on the back of the card was not centered. There was no way I was going to give those cards out to people. I was lamenting my error to Scott Barlow when he suggested I contact Moo. He claimed they had an outrageous satisfaction policy. Not a chance, I thought. This was my error and Moo was not likely to help out.

I was curious enough to check the website. On the Moo website, I found what they call the Moo promise, which is;

MOO's promise

We've never thought 'satisfaction guaranteed' was the most inspiring phrase. We'd like you to be satisfied of course, but we'd prefer it if you were absolutely thrilled beyond words with your order. We take great pride in our work, and we want you to feel the same about yours. So, even for the tiniest of typos, we’ll move heaven and earth to make sure you get exactly what you want – or your money back!”

My call with Moo proves they back up their promise. They do make sure you get exactly what you want.

Here are the three things you can learn from the exceptional service Moo delivers on the phone;

  1. Answer the phone with a smile.
  2. Make it a policy to delight your customers.
  3. Give your customers more than they expect.

If you would like to try Moo, you can get 10% off your first order by clicking here.

Feb 14, 2016

Lee Cockerell is the former Executive Vice President of Operations for Walt Disney World. Lee joins the Jody Maberry Show to offer lessons from Disney you can apply to your business.

"It's not the magic that makes it work; it is the way we work that makes it magic."

In this episode, Lee explains what it looks like for small businesses and entrepreneurs to create magic. Creating magic is easier than you think it will be. Have a great website, answer your phone, return calls, look professional are just some of the simple things Lee offers as a way to create magic.

If you want to figure out how to create magic, get feedback from customers, colleagues and friends. Feedback will help you figure out what you do best and where you need to improve.

Lee also explains why a podcast is an important tool to mobilize your message. And if you want to master your message, Lee suggests you study and practice. First learn, then practice, and then teach to master your message.

Lee's Podcast = Creating Disney Magic
Lee's Books = Creating Magic, The Customer Rules, Time Management Magic
Lee Cockerell on Twitter = @LeeCockerell

Other Resources mentioned;
Out West by Dayton Duncan
Dealing with Anxiety episode of Creating Disney Magic Podcast

Feb 14, 2016

When I was a park ranger, I had the opportunity to help a lady who was camping solo for the first time since her husband died. Her grand adventure took an unfortunate turn when she was not able to set the tent up by herself. In 20 minutes, I was able to set her tent up, and in the process, I learned some lessons on how you can be a park ranger to your customers. 

Here are the points you need to remember from this story so you can be a park ranger to your customers.

  1. Identify the people you can help. As a park ranger, it was easy to identify this lady needed help, but what if my approach would have been just to show up at every campsite and ask if they needed help with something? What are the chances a burly guy in flannel would have needed the park ranger's help to start a campfire? It would have been a waste of my time, and I would have probably missed the opportunity to get in front of the person who really needed help.
  2. Put yourself in front of the right people. How would the same story have played out if I had stayed in my ranger truck and told myself “if anyone needs help, they will find me”. I would not have had the opportunity to help the lady. Someone else would have helped her, or she would have gone home in frustration.
  3. Be identified as an authority. When the handsome man with the badge and flat hat walked into her campsite, she knew right away I could help her. She knew she could trust me. So she opened up and told me about her husband passing away and how she could not set up the tent. If the burly guy in flannel had walked into her campsite would she have been so open about her problem? Probably not. My uniform built the authority and trust she needed to open up. What have you done to build authority, credibility, and trust where people can identify you as someone who can solve their problem?
  4. You are only a piece of the customer's story. The park ranger who saved the day was only a small piece of her adventure. The real story is her first camping trip since her husband died. Perhaps without the park ranger, she would have given up and went home, but all I did as the ranger was provide her with a solution so she could have her adventure. You need to understand you are a piece of your customers story. Find a way to explain how what you do will help them live out their adventure and create their own story in some way. I spent only 20 minutes with the lady. You have to make your 20 minutes count.
  5. Exceed expectations. When this lady paid the fee for a night of camping, she expected to get a campsite to herself for one night, the use of clean bathroom facilities, and access to all of the natural beauty at the park. She did not expect to get a park ranger to give her personal time and attention to help set up her tent. That went way beyond her expectations, and it did not cost her any more than the camping fee. It took me only 20 minutes, and she is probably still telling people about it today. Consider what you can do to go beyond the expectations of your customer. Truthfully, most people have become accustomed to not having their expectations met. So if you can meet expectations you have already won. But if you can exceed those expectations, you have earned a loyal customer. Do you think the lady went camping again after that trip? I bet she did.
  6. Work within your message. To keep it simple, let’s say the message of a park ranger is to protect and serve parks and people. I marketed the message by being in uniform. For a park ranger, there is no better marketing than the uniform. I mobilized the message walking the campground and getting your message out in front of the people. I mastered the message by telling the lady I could help, and then delivering on the promise. When our interaction was over, I know she believed the message of a park ranger was to protect and serve parks and people. And perhaps more importantly, I believed the message too.

If you can apply those five lessons into your business, you will be strutting around like a park ranger. And you will serve your customers better.

Feb 13, 2016

Do you ever wonder if there is a magic formula for marketing? Should you just copy what other people are doing? How do you stand out?

In this episodes, Mike Kim will explain how you can market yourself like no one else can. Mike Kim is a marketing consultant, communications strategist, and copywriter. After a couple of career pivots, Mike has set himself apart by leveraging his personal story to connect with other people.

During this interview, Mike Kim will give you the exact steps he uses with his clients to market yourself like no one else can. The key to marketing yourself is to uncover the elements of your story that make you unique.

If you want help setting yourself apart from the crowd, check out Mike's Brand You Blueprint. The Brand You Blueprint will give you a strategic overview on what it takes to a fun, fulfilling, and profitable personal brand business. You can get the Brand You Blueprint here.

Mike's Twitter = @MikeKimTV
Mike's website = mikekim.com

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