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The Jody Maberry Show

The Jody Maberry Show explores the nature of business. Jody Maberry is a former Park Ranger who became the happiest podcaster on earth. With a mix of storytelling, lessons, and occasional guests, Jody gives you a look at the work he does with executives as he helps them build their brand.
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Now displaying: Page 2
May 11, 2022

Cassie Tucker returns today and we are laying out the greatest marketing lessons you are going to find. And I learned them from my dog.

As a dog owner, I am very interested in making sure my four-legged family member is taken care of. Not too long ago, I learned about a dog boarding and daycare company that markets their product in such an amazing way that I am now a customer. Here are seven lessons I have learned from a doggy daycare that business owners can adopt to their marketing.

First, there is value in word of mouth. Happy customers will share with others. Second, it is helpful to have a red velvet rope mentality. If there is a process that needs to be walked through, customers feel like they are part of something special.

Next, crest a story for people to be part of. Give people a narrative to participate in. Fourth, understand what product you offer. You have a core offering, and you have the underlying experience that is at the center of your products. That is what you need to highlight for those who come across your services.

Next, create more services for people to take part in. If you offer extra, there will always be someone who wants to take part in it. Sixth, scarcity, and exclusivity make people feel good about what they have bought. With exclusive offerings, you create a level of urgency that people want to act on. If you go this route, make sure you allow people to put themselves on a waitlist or opt into getting more information as the service or space becomes available.

Last, maintaining the customer experience should take priority over getting new customers. Taking care of existing customers should always take priority over bringing in new customers. If you can spend five dollars to take care of your current client versus spending five dollars to get a new client,  always take care of your current client. Be honest with yourself and understand how much is too much for you to provide a good product. Don’t spread yourself too thin at the expense of your existing clients' experience.

They may be a dog boarding company, but Dogtown definitely has an edge in marketing a unique experience that instills value and creates long-term clients.

Apr 13, 2022

Recently I was a keynote speaker for a conference for park professionals in the midwest. I spoke on Role and Purpose and how parks can thrive once they understand every job has a role to perform, and every role plays into the bigger purpose of the park. 

Once I was off stage, many people came up to ask questions and talk about my topic. As a speaker, the biggest compliment you can get for your presentation is someone seeking you out to ask questions. When someone finds me to ask a question, I know I have made a connection.

After my morning keynote, and later in the day, I had the opportunity to talk to several people about Role and Purpose. Even the following day, the conversations continued. 

A few weeks after my presentation, the event organizer sent me some reviews they collected directly from the app they used for the event. 

As I read the reviews, I was feeling good as I saw comments like:

"The concept stuck with me, and I intend to apply that to our team."

"Love the concept."

"It was a good way to get people thinking. A lot of organizations don't have a purpose that is known by the whole team."

Then one review stuck out:

"I'm sure he is a nice guy, so I blame the person who picked him thinking he was appropriate for this audience. Just not good."

Wait a minute...

For a moment, this is all I focused on. 

Do you ever get hung up on negative words from someone else? It doesn't matter how many compliments we get; we focus on the few negative comments. 

Don't let it stop you. You are not for everyone. 

If you let a negative review keep you from getting on stage, everyone else will miss out on your message. 

At this conference, where many people come to learn about park operations, safety, and new equipment, not everyone wants to hear how they can be better leaders. That is fine. The topic is not for people who are fixed on how they do things. The topic is not for everyone. 

I'm not for everyone. And neither are you. 

Keep writing your blog. Keep recording your podcast. Keep creating YouTube videos. Keep creating, and know you are not for everyone. 

Apr 6, 2022

You can find out more about the Perch at https://jodymaberry.com/perch

Mar 24, 2022

With the Jody Maberry Show, I like to give you a behind-the-scenes look at what it is like to work with the people I work with. 

In this episode, Dan Cockerell and I talk about what it took to put together a cruise for his online community, known as The Perch. Dan explains what led to doing a cruise for the community. Then he discusses what he would do differently about the next cruise. 

A member of the Perch, Rob Midiri, joins us as a guest on the episode to ask questions to both me and Dan. In fact, Rob was the inspiration behind this episode. Since he asked Dan and me questions, we decided to turn on the microphone, record the conversation, and share it with everyone. 

Rob gives his impression of the cruise and what it was like to spend several days with the group. 

Rob's questions centered around interviewing podcast guests. Rob asks:

How do you transition between different shows since the people you work with have different personalities?

What do you do to get to know someone before you have them as a guest on your podcast?

How long did it take you to get used to the interview process?

Do you use interviewing skills you learned at Disney when interviewing people for your podcast?

What tactics do you use to help get information out of guests on your podcast?

The cruise was a big success, and Dan and I plan on hosting another cruise in 2023. 

If you want to learn more about joining The Perch, you can get more information here -jodymaberry.com/perch.

Don't forget; Dan Cockerell has a great podcast, Come Rain or Shine. You can find it Here

Feb 23, 2022

Cassie Tucker is back, and we are unpacking five lessons learned from live events and how they are run, especially in this post covid world. These lessons may be specific to a live event setting, but they are principles that can extrapolate into just about any arena of business.

First, set yourself up for adjustments. Every single day something will change. When you expect it and plan for it, you will keep everything running smoothly. Have backups. Think through the worst-case scenario and plan accordingly. Second, you win by thinking inside the box. Innovation is great, but if there are rules and policies required to be able to participate, it is better to stay in line and innovate around the non-negotiables.

Next, you will get more done by influence than authority. You may have the authority needed to force an issue, but if you can steer and direct with influence, everyone will have a better experience. If you find yourself at the point that you must use your authority, something has already gone wrong. Fourth, people want to be with people. Creating the opportunity and space for face time and connection will help establish a report and an environment that people want to be in.

Last, be ready rather than get ready. If you must get "ready," you are already losing. Keep in mind the highest authority in your company and run your area in such a way that you will be excited when they show up because it is an opportunity for them to see how well it is going. Leaders are proactive, and if you are ready from the get-go, you can pivot and adjust as things come up.

These lessons not only make for superb events, but they will also create a strong environment for any business out there.

Connect with Jody:

www.jodymaberry.com

Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/sugarjmaberry

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jodymaberry/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/sugarjmaberry/

Feb 16, 2022

There are lessons to be learned from most interactions and experiences. They can then be applied to many different areas of life. Cassie Tucker and I are taking some time today to extrapolate the seven lessons I learned from my time in the Luxury Homebuilder business.

First, show up on time. Do that, and you will always have an advantage. It is simple, but something that people notice. Second, simply put, do what you say you will do. Be a person of your word, and people will talk about you behind your back in the best way possible. Third, always be upfront about costs. Don’t try to bait people with the promise of a lower price and then inflate it at the last minute. If there is ever any reason for a price increase, make sure you communicate scope creep as soon as possible.

Next, show your work. Give people the ability to see behind the veil. Share stories and pictures of where the work is getting done. People appreciate transparency. Make sure your communication is clear and copious. You cannot over-communicate when people are investing time and money. Next, the office or point of entry to your space sets the expectation for your business. When people walk in, that experience will set their expectations for what you do behind the scenes. What foot are you putting forward?

Lastly, use words wisely. You may like how something sounds, but if it isn’t providing clarity for the customer, get rid of it. Eliminate the fluff so you can be concise and clear. Regardless of your industry or the service you offer, the foundation is the same. Create a consistent, clear, and valued product from start to finish. 

Connect with Jody:

www.jodymaberry.com

Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/sugarjmaberry

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jodymaberry/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/sugarjmaberry/

 

Dec 8, 2021

We live in a day when politics can be a very dividing topic. Rather than looking at the divides that surround it, Peter Hinga and I are taking a deeper look at the lessons we can take from politics and apply them to our personal brand.

Peter Hinga started his political journey volunteering on local campaigns as a teenager. He and his father bonded over politics in a surprising way. He progressed through internships and made his debut in the congressional campaign circuit in 2004. He has run campaigns and now focuses on consulting.

Running for office has many lessons that are applicable across the board. Understanding your why and making sure that you want to set your hand to something is not a respecter of industry. Whether you are a politician, an entrepreneur, or an employee, your personal brand is front-facing. Connections and buy-in create influence. Getting involved and upfront with your potential audience in an industry will help you build connections and gain experience you can’t gain any other way.

No matter your industry, you need to be authentic. Don’t just be a talking head spouting talking points and lose yourself in the process. You can say all the right things and still fall flat if you don’t lean into what makes you uniquely you.

Know your audience, really get to know them. It can be tempting to spread out but don’t make the mistake of going broad right away. Start at your home base where you are strongest and then build from there.

Lastly, make sure you know how to roll with the punches. Don’t take things personally, but recognize when you can apply feedback. Get in front of the negative and approach things from a place of transparency rather than being caught off guard.

Resources:

Twitter

LinkedIn

Connect with Jody:

www.jodymaberry.com

Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/sugarjmaberry

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jodymaberry/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/sugarjmaberry/

Nov 24, 2021

I recently received not one, but two of the same type of marketing pieces. I hate to say it, but it wasn’t the best marketing I have seen. It got me thinking, what makes a good marketing piece? I have Cassie Tucker back with me again to dive a little deeper into what makes a good piece and what these landscaping companies can do to improve on their attempts at getting their services out to the public.

Check out what others in your industry are doing and learn from it. Determine where your future clients are going to find info on the services you offer. Once you identify where make sure you are there. Maybe it is on review sites or inside local Facebook groups. Wherever it is, make sure you have representation.

It is ok to change your marketing focus by season. Often, people are looking for services at certain times. Make it simple to find you. Spend time getting to know people. Take the initiative and network with individuals in complementary industries. This is a great way to get your business in front of those who need your services.

Last, remember that experience is key. The best advertisement you can get is word of mouth from happy customers. Make sure your messaging is key, and you equip your team to provide consistent service. You can have the best marketing possible, but without providing consistent customer service, you may as well be tossing business cards tied in a bag with a rock.

Connect with Jody:

www.jodymaberry.com

Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/sugarjmaberry

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jodymaberry/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/sugarjmaberry/

Nov 17, 2021

Lee Kitchen is back for our follow-up episodes where we flip the script, and my guest becomes the interviewer. Lee came up with a fun set of questions, and I can’t wait to answer them.

First, when you were young, what did you want to be when you grew up? I had a top three that were about as different as you can come up with. But they all make sense in their way.

Second, if you were a Disney tour guide, what four attractions would you make sure your guests saw? Well, you will have to listen for the suggestions, but I will let you know you need a park hopper pass to see them all…or stay for multiple days.

Third, in eight years as a park ranger, how many yogi bear jokes did you hear? A lot. But there was something I was asked or told many more times, and it might surprise you.

Lastly, I let Ken sneak in a bonus question…and I’ll give you a hint…the answer earned me a label of “squirrel guy”. I hope you enjoy these questions and answers today. I know I did.

Connect with Jody:

www.jodymaberry.com

Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/sugarjmaberry

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jodymaberry/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/sugarjmaberry/

Nov 10, 2021

One definition of insanity is doing the same thing repeatedly, but expecting a different result. Today, most industries have a rapidly changing landscape, and it is not enough to approach questions and problems from the same angle. Lee Kitchen is here unpacking the concept of Design Thinking and how you can set yourself apart by learning to look at your situation from a different perspective.

Lee Kitchen is one magical dude. After a 32-year career with Disney, he now brings his experience and knowledge to companies everywhere. He is a speaker, consultant, and trainer who specializes in challenging the approach we take to problem-solving and transforming it into a journey of discovery.

All too often, when presented with a problem, the baseline approach is to tackle it head-on. The linear approach seems to be a default in many industries. Design Thinking is a structured way of thinking that takes an abstract or sideways approach to tackle an issue.

There are four aspects to Design Thinking: scoping, empathizing, ideating and inspiring and idea developing. Scoping is all about taking apart your challenge and reassembling it in a way that ensures you are tackling the "right" challenge. Once you identify the correct challenge, you can’t simply rely on the data; you must humanize it. Dig deep with your customers and make sure you are approaching your challenge with the end in mind. Once you have your idea and your research, get everyone together, not just the experts. Brainstorm and hear from everyone involved. The last piece is making sure you have the infrastructure in place to implement your decisions and gain traction.

It is important to be challenged in the way you look at things. Breaking out of what you have always done and looking at situations from a new vantage point will keep you from being left behind.

Resources:

Magicaldude.com

Connect with Lee on LinkedIn 

Connect with Jody:

www.jodymaberry.com

Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/sugarjmaberry

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jodymaberry/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/sugarjmaberry/

Nov 3, 2021

We live in a competitive world. For every skill or discipline, there is a number of practitioners. So what can you do to set yourself apart and make the best offer possible? Dan Cockerell returns to share the lessons he has learned over the past three years.

Dan Cockerell is the former Vice President of the Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World. His podcast, Come Rain or Shine, centers on creating and maintaining a magical culture in any organization. He is a speaker, consultant, and coach and has a lot to offer when it comes to submitting pitches and making offers that are irresistible.

When you submit an offer or a pitch, it is important to differentiate yourself from the beginning. Respond quickly to inquiries. Clearly explain your methodology and what you do. Don’t try to sell; try to understand. Ask questions and then use their answers to help form what it is you can do for them. Dan submits a custom video for requests to help potential clients clearly communicate what they will receive from him. Lastly, give a tiered cost structure. At least two options, three if you can. Don’t alienate clients by giving them a one-and-done offer.

When you commit yourself to understanding how to serve, you will be able to submit the best possible offer and set yourself apart from the competition.

Resources:

The Perch Membership Community-Special Offer: $1/first month; $49/month after 

Connect with Jody:

www.jodymaberry.com

Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/sugarjmaberry

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jodymaberry/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/sugarjmaberry/

Oct 20, 2021

It is an honor to have Colonel Kevin Benson with me. Col. Benson is highly decorated. His military career spans 30 years, during which he was the Director of the School of Advanced Military Studies and has become an Adjunct Scholar at West Point. As impressive as his career has been, even more, impressive is the extreme wisdom and humility that guides him.

The poem ‘If’ by Rudyard Kipling ends with a challenge to fill the “unforgiving minute with sixty seconds worth of distance run”. Col. Benson took this challenge to heart, pursuing his Ph.D. as a means of filling that unforgiving minute.

It is important to take the opportunities we have been given and refuse to rest on our laurels, no matter how impressive. Like those who have gone before, it is our responsibility to challenge ourselves and give back. Passing on what we know to the younger generation helps them to succeed as well.

One of the best ways we can grow is to move beyond asking what or how questions. We need to be asking why. Asking why helps us to uncover the reasoning behind past decisions. When we can understand the context of the moment, we can understand the decision that was made and what the end goal was.

Past or present, we can always find the opportunity to learn from others. Embrace that you aren’t the smartest person in the room. Everyone can contribute, and you can learn from anyone and everyone if you set your mind to. A humble leader refuses to throw anything away but evaluates and takes in the ideas presented. The way we approach the minute sets the standard.

Resources:

Red Teaming by Bryce Hoffman

Colonel Benson on Twitter

Connect with Jody:

www.jodymaberry.com

Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/sugarjmaberry

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jodymaberry/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/sugarjmaberry/

Oct 20, 2021

Once again, it is time for a guest on the show to turn the tables and ask me three questions. Col. Kevin Benson returns with a few thought-provoking questions that I am excited to answer for you today. Listen until the end, he also unpacks a special extension on our previous conversation about filling the unforgiving minute.

First, how did you come to conclude that conducting podcast interviews was your chosen line of work? This is an interesting question. Would you believe it, like many things, stemmed from my love of parks?

What delighted you about being a park ranger? This is an easy answer. What is more appealing, dealing with numbers or being in the outdoors?

Last, what is a path that you thought about taking but didn’t? If it weren’t for a three-month car trip, I may have ended up working for one of the most stable and well-known companies in Illinois. I’m grateful for that trip.

Connect with Jody:

www.jodymaberry.com

Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/sugarjmaberry

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jodymaberry/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/sugarjmaberry/

Oct 13, 2021

I am excited to say Jeff Nole has returned! After a year without getting together in person, the stars have aligned, and we spent the last three days hiking at Glacier National Park. When I think of Jeff Noel, I think of a man that knows how to live in the present moment. He has invested time and energy into cultivating a life of being present, and that is something we all need a little more of.

There is a moment in time that is right now. Appreciating that moment and being grateful is a key component in being happy. Gratitude is part of the context of being happy. Every day, there are so many things to be grateful for. When we are intentional about appreciating our present and are grateful for it, we will be happy.

Being present doesn’t happen by accident. It takes intentionally building structure and processes and investing energy around being present. As you work being present and being grateful into your life, it becomes muscle memory. It becomes easier and easier to do.

If you are looking for a simple first step to being present, it is simply to enjoy where you are. Allow moments to happen organically. Linger in the present instead of looking for what is coming next. Enjoy what’s here right now; what’s in front of you. Life moves fast. Take autopilot off and start steering your own life toward embracing your present moment. Embrace the concept of compounded interest and let gratitude grow through slow and steady deposits invested in your present moment.

Connect with Jody:

www.jodymaberry.com

Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/sugarjmaberry

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jodymaberry/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/sugarjmaberry/

Oct 6, 2021

It’s that time again. Cassie Tucker returns to bring three questions of her own creation to the table. Full disclosure, I do turn the tables on her towards the end.

First, what is your favorite national park and why? This is a pretty easy question for me, but it is a tie. It all depends; are you looking for scenic views or majestic wildlife?

Second, outside of the podcasts you and your clients have, what is your favorite podcast? I have a few. Would it surprise you to learn that one of them actually has five-hour episodes, and I listen to the whole thing? It’s that good.

Lastly, What is one of the biggest mistakes you see made in podcasting, and how can podcasters correct it? The biggest mistakes boil down to follow-through and how you interact with your listener…but you will have to listen to hear the specifics.

Resources:

Cassie Tucker Instagram

Connect with Jody:

www.jodymaberry.com

Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/sugarjmaberry

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jodymaberry/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/sugarjmaberry/

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